What’s the most requested flower this wedding season?

Recently I sent out a twitter request & email to our mailing list, asking for input on seven different questions. Thank you to everyone who sent in their replies!!

Question #7:
What’s the most requested flower this wedding season?

Peonies!
By Rose of Sharon Floral Designs of Arkansas

bouquet with peach and coral flowers

Designed by Rose of Sharon

peach and pink bouquet

Designed by Rose of Sharon

Our brides have definitely joined the peony obsession, especially in their bouquets. When peonies are not within their budget, our brides love English Garden Roses as a substitute. Orchids are also highly requested and used within our special event designs.
Jennifer of Mancuso’s Florist of Michigan

white and blush bridal bouquet

Designed by Mancuso’s Florist

white bridal bouquet

Designed by Mancuso’s Florist

pink peony bridal bouquet

Designed by Mancuso’s Florist.

We are always behind the trends in South Texas. Succulents are huge now, everybody is using them.
Sheri of Blumen Meisters, Texas

bridal bouquet with succulents and anemones

Designed by Blumen Meisters

pink and orange bridal bouquet

Designed by Blumen Meisters

Probably the most requested flower this season is garden roses.
Kris of The KRISanthemums, Oregon

peach stock and pink rose bouquet

Designed by KRISanthemums

It’s become a running joke for us this year that if it doesn’t have dusty miller in it, it’s not a wedding. (We have our share of succulents, too.)
Gerry & Rebecca of Petal’s Edge Floral Design, Virginia & Washington DC

orange succulent bouquet

Designed by Petals Edge

pink and white bouquets

Designed by Petals Edge

pink and blush centerpiece

Designed by Sophisticated Floral Designs

bouquet with dusty miller and peach flowers

Designed by Petals Edge

Most requested flower? The Coral Charm Peony. No surprise there.
Sue of White Magnolia Designs, Washington DC

blush bridal bouquet

Designed by White Magnolia Designs

peony bridal bouquet

Designed by White Magnolia Designs

Succulent, followed by hydrangea, ranunculus and garden roses.
Lora of Sophisticated Floral Designs, Oregon

coral and white bridal bouquet

Designed by Sophisticated Floral Designs

blue and white floral centerpiece

Designed by Sophisticated Floral Designs

succulent boutonniere

Designed by Sophisticated Floral Designs

white grey and yellow bouquet

Designed by Sophisticated Floral Designs

purple and orange bouquet

Designed by Sophisticated Floral Designs

orange roses and orchids and succulent bouquet

Designed by Sophisticated Floral Designs

white hydrangea and succulent bouquet

Designed by Sophisticated Floral Designs

boutonniere with succulents

Designed by Sophisticated Floral Designs

woodland centerpiece

Designed by Sophisticated Floral Designs

Peonies. I’m starting to not like them as much. The growers cannot seem to meet the demand and a lot of the plants are inmature leading to small buds and high prices. Let’s also add to this list anything blush and muted colors.
Alexandra, Exquisite Designs, Illinois

pink and orange flower centerpiece

Designed by Exquisite Designs. Photograph by Ashley Biess Photography

Orange fall flower centerpiece

Designed by Exquisite Designs.

pink and green flower centerpiece

Designed by Exquisite Designs.

Red flower arrangement

Designed by Exquisite Designs.

pink and white flower centerpiece

Designed by Exquisite Designs.

The most requested flower this past spring was ranunculus. A close second was peony. For this summer the most requested flower is dahlia.
Kate Sparks, Lilies and Lavender, Pennsylvania

white and pink flower centerpiece

Designed by Lilies and Lavender

dahlia bridal bouquet with crape myrtle berries, dill and sea oats

Designed by Lilies and Lavender

Peonies!
Jane of Budget Blooms, British Columbia, Canada

white peony and queen anne's lace bouquet

Designed by Budget Blooms

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Comments

  1. I’m tired of blush and muted colors too. I still love peonies. I have a flower farm and grow 90% of what I use in my wedding designs. Peonies take at least 3 years to produce useable stems. This is why supply isn’t keeping up with demand. It’s easy to keep up with trendy annual, biennials and most perennial flowers. Slow
    growing perennials such as peonies and baptisia and woodie ornamentals take 3-5 years to produce in quantity.
    Here’s another question. What will be popular in three years, five years? Anyone with a crystal ball and space to grow the most popular flowers will be way ahead of the game. I’m hoping the wild flower, garden look will still be the trend. I’m investing in clematis, currants, pink blueberries, campanula.

  2. Hydrangea & peonies ruled the roost this year.

  3. Dahlias! Kate- planting dahlias will probably be a great idea!

  4. This is really great. Love all the work shown. Its really awesome to see what other people are doing.

  5. I love hearing abou what other designers are using. I haven’t seen a huge demand for peonies, but I have yet to have a wedding without garden roses this year, and I’m totally ok with that – I am having a serious love affair with them!

  6. It seems cliche, but it’s peonies for us! And, in Hawai’i, orchids are always in high demand, no matter the season.

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